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    Guyana INDEPENDENCE AND THE BURNHAM ERA
    http://workmall.com/wfb2001/guyana/guyana_history_independence_and_the_burnham_era.html
    Source: The Library of Congress Country Studies
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    [JPEG]

    Saint George's Anglican Church in Georgetown, built in 1889, is one of the tallest wooden buildings in the world.
    Courtesy Embassy of Guyana, Washington

    Burnham in Power

    In the first year under Burnham, conditions in the colony began to stabilize. The new coalition administration broke diplomatic ties with Cuba and implemented policies that favored local investors and foreign industry. The colony applied the renewed flow of Western aid to further development of its infrastructure. A constitutional conference was held in London; the conference set May 26, 1966 as the date for the colony's independence. By the time independence was achieved, the country was enjoying economic growth and relative domestic peace.

    The newly independent Guyana at first sought to improve relations with its neighbors. For instance, in December 1965 the country had become a charter member of the Caribbean Free Trade Association (Carifta). Relations with Venezuela were not so placid, however. In 1962 Venezuela had announced that it was rejecting the 1899 boundary and would renew its claim to all of Guyana west of the Essequibo River. In 1966 Venezuela seized the Guyanese half of Ankoko Island, in the Cuyuni River, and two years later claimed a strip of sea along Guyana's western coast.

    Another challenge to the newly independent government came at the beginning of January 1969, with the Rupununi Rebellion. In the Rupununi region in southwest Guyana, along the Venezuelan border, white settlers and Amerindians rebelled against the central government. Several Guyanese policemen in the area were killed, and spokesmen for the rebels declared the area independent and asked for Venezuelan aid. Troops arrived from Georgetown within days, and the rebellion was quickly put down. Although the rebellion was not a large affair, it exposed underlying tensions in the new state and the Amerindians' marginalized role in the country's political and social life.

    Data as of January 1992


    NOTE: The information regarding Guyana on this page is re-published from The Library of Congress Country Studies. No claims are made regarding the accuracy of Guyana INDEPENDENCE AND THE BURNHAM ERA information contained here. All suggestions for corrections of any errors about Guyana INDEPENDENCE AND THE BURNHAM ERA should be addressed to the Library of Congress.

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    http://workmall.com/wfb2001/guyana/guyana_history_independence_and_the_burnham_era.html

    Revised 24-Jul-02
    Copyright © 2001 Photius Coutsoukis (all rights reserved)


    ctr12/21/01