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    Japan NARA AND HEIAN PERIODS, A.D. 710-1185
    http://workmall.com/wfb2001/japan/japan_history_nara_and_heian_periods_ad_710_1185.html
    Source: The Library of Congress Country Studies
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    [JPEG]

    The eighth-century Nara Daibutsu, Todaiji
    Courtesy Asahi Shimbun

    Economic, Social, and Administrative Developments

    Before the Taiho Code was established, the capital was customarily moved after the death of an emperor because of the ancient belief that a place of death was polluted. Reforms and bureaucratization of government led to the establishment of a permanent imperial capital at Heijokyo, or Nara, in A.D. 710. The capital at Nara, which gave its name to the new period (710-94), was styled after the grand Chinese Tang Dynasty (618-907) capital at Chang'an and was the first truly urban center in Japan. It soon had a population of 200,000, representing nearly 4 percent of the country's population, and some 10,000 people worked in government jobs.

    Economic and administrative activity increased during the Nara period. Roads linked Nara to provincial capitals, and taxes were collected more efficiently and routinely. Coins were minted, if not widely used. Outside the Nara area, however, there was little commercial activity, and in the provinces the old Shotoku land reform systems declined. By the mid-eighth century, shoen (landed estates), one of the most important economic institutions in medieval Japan, began to rise as a result of the search for a more manageable form of landholding. Local administration gradually became more self-sufficient, while the breakdown of the old land distribution system and the rise of taxes led to the loss or abandonment of land by many people who became the "wave people," or ronin (see Glossary). Some of these formerly "public people" were privately employed by large landholders, and "public lands" increasingly reverted to the shoen.

    Factional fighting at the imperial court continued throughout the Nara period. Imperial family members, leading court families, such as the Fujiwara, and Buddhist priests all contended for influence. In the late Nara period, financial burdens on the state increased, and the court began dismissing nonessential officials. In 792 universal conscription was abandoned, and district heads were allowed to establish private militia forces for local police work. Decentralization of authority became the rule despite the reforms of the Nara period. Eventually, to return control to imperial hands, the capital was moved in 784 to Nagaoka and in 794 to Heiankyo (Capital of Peace and Tranquillity), or Heian, about twenty-six kilometers north of Nara. By the late eleventh century, the city was popularly called Kyoto (Capital City), the name it has had every since.

    Data as of January 1994


    NOTE: The information regarding Japan on this page is re-published from The Library of Congress Country Studies. No claims are made regarding the accuracy of Japan NARA AND HEIAN PERIODS, A.D. 710-1185 information contained here. All suggestions for corrections of any errors about Japan NARA AND HEIAN PERIODS, A.D. 710-1185 should be addressed to the Library of Congress.

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    http://workmall.com/wfb2001/japan/japan_history_nara_and_heian_periods_ad_710_1185.html

    Revised 04-Jul-02
    Copyright © 2001 Photius Coutsoukis (all rights reserved)


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